Change Day Stories

Janet McCabe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Janet McCabe is an assistant professor at the University of Saskatchewan College of Nursing

Nursing professor encourages students to pledge

 

After learning about Saskatchewan Change Day through Twitter, Dr. Janet McCabe decided to take action.

McCabe, an assistant professor at the University of Saskatchewan College of Nursing’s Prince Albert campus, encouraged students in her NURS 200 class to make a pledge for the campaign. McCabe challenged the students to write a pledge based on the Saskatchewan Registered Nurses’ Association (SRNA) Standards and Competencies. She also encouraged them to connect their pledges to improving their own health, the health of their future patients, or the health of the health care system.

McCabe felt the decision to use Saskatchewan Change Day within the classroom context was a natural fit, as it “helped students to connect current class content to their future roles as student nurses and, ultimately, registered nurses in a meaningful way.”

“It is important for nursing students to understand that, as nurses, we have an obligation to advocate for better health care, as well as to appreciate that healthy change can start with an individual and expand from there,” she said.

McCabe said her students were interested in Change Day because the campaign “reaches out to everyone in Saskatchewan, making health care a responsibility of everyone – not just those in the system.”

Saskatchewan Change Day is a province-wide campaign organized by the Health Quality Council. It is part of an exciting global movement aimed at making small health care improvements. The Change Day concept originated in the National Health Service in the United Kingdom and has since spread to countries around the world, including Sweden, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, India, Jordan, the Netherlands, Finland, Australia, New Zealand, Scotland, Northern Ireland, and the provinces of Saskatchewan, B.C., and Alberta in Canada.

This year’s Saskatchewan Change Day theme is “Make Health Better Together.” Participants can pledge to do something to improve their own health, the health of their workplace, or the health of the patients, residents, or clients they serve.

Anyone who provides health care, receives health care, or who cares about health care can pledge to make a difference. A pledge is an idea for improvement that is meaningful to the pledger. People are asked to enter their pledges on the Saskatchewan Change Day website by Change Day on November 5, 2015. HQC has set the goal of receiving 2,015 pledges from across the province by Change Day 2015, more than doubling the 2014 campaign goal of receiving 1,000 pledges.

McCabe said her colleagues were also excited about the Saskatchewan Change Day campaign, noting it is a good way to involve students in grassroots-level change. On Nov. 5, a Change Day table will be set up over the lunch hour in the main hallway at the Prince Albert campus to encourage all students, staff, and faculty to make a pledge.

“The health care system is always in need of change, and is always changing. Sometimes we get too caught up in the day-to-day administration and budgets and forget that real people are being affected by the changes that we implement – whether that is the patient or the nurse,” said McCabe.

“As professionals, we need to use every opportunity to advocate for effective, equitable health care for all individuals.”

 

 

Joubert Ray (2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ray Joubert is the registrar of the Saskatchewan College of Pharmacy Professionals

Pharmacist pledges to promote medication safety

 

Ray Joubert is committed to patient safety, and his Saskatchewan Change Day pledge reflects that.

Joubert, the registrar of the Saskatchewan College of Pharmacy Professionals, pledged to “take advantage of every opportunity to promote medication safety for all patients and safe medication practices in the pharmacy.”

“More needs to be done to improve the ways in which medications are distributed and used as we learn more and more about the harm of unsafe medication practices,” he said.

The Saskatchewan College of Pharmacy Professionals is the self-governing body for the profession of pharmacy in the province. Joubert said the organization is supporting an important initiative called COMPASS, or Community Pharmacists Advancing Safety in Saskatchewan.

“It is a continuous quality assurance pilot project for community pharmacies. Its main aims are to promote medication safety and safe medication practices,” he said.

“This pledge will help me focus on every opportunity to influence successful deployment of this project.”

Saskatchewan Change Day is a province-wide campaign organized by the Health Quality Council (HQC). It is part of a global movement aimed at making small health care improvements. The idea is that everyone can make a change for the better, and that together these small changes can add up to make a big difference.

Anyone who provides health care, receives health care, or who cares about health care can pledge to make a difference. A pledge is an idea for improvement that is meaningful to the pledger. People are asked to enter their pledges on the Saskatchewan Change Day website by Change Day on Nov. 5, 2015. HQC has set the goal of receiving 2,015 pledges from across the province by Change Day 2015 – more than doubling the 2014 campaign goal of receiving 1,000 pledges.

 

 

Amanda Reimer

Amanda Reimer is a senior benefit services officer at 3sHealth

3sHealth employee focuses on customer service

 

Employees at 3sHealth are showing their support for the second annual Saskatchewan Change Day campaign by coming up with improvement ideas and making pledges.

Amanda Reimer, senior benefit services officer, and members of her team are committed to providing excellent customer service to the more than 42,000 3sHealth Employee Benefits Plan members. For that reason, Reimer’s Change Day pledge is to step in and take calls and assist the benefit service officers in other ways when needed so that the department is meeting its customer service targets.

Reimer believes everyone provides better service if they are not feeling under pressure all the time.

“Some of the calls can be pretty complicated,” she said.

“So, by offering to step in and answer calls, I am giving someone else a chance to reflect, have a more thoughtful work process, and connect with the purpose of our job. In the end, that provides better service to our customers.”

Saskatchewan Change Day will be held on November 5, 2015. This year’s Saskatchewan Change Day theme is “Make Health Better Together.” Participants can pledge, on the Change Day website, to do something to improve their own health, the health of their workplace, or the health of the patients, residents, or clients they serve.

 

 

Galilee Thompson and Jeffrey Poon 2

Galilee Thompson (left) and Jeffrey Poon hold signs displaying their pledges

Medical students support Saskatchewan Change Day campaign

 

The Student Medical Society of Saskatchewan (SMSS) is supporting the second annual Change Day campaign by encouraging health sciences students to make a pledge.

The SMSS is the representative body for all students studying at the University of Saskatchewan (U of S) College of Medicine. On Oct. 26 and Oct. 27, 2015, SMSS representatives set up a Change Day booth in the U of S Health Sciences Building, where they encouraged medical students and other U of S health sciences students to make a pledge.

Saskatchewan Change Day is a province-wide campaign organized by the Health Quality Council (HQC). It is part of a global movement aimed at making small health care improvements. The idea is that everyone can make a change for the better, and that together these small changes can add up to make a big difference.

Anyone who provides health care, receives health care, or who cares about health care can pledge to make a difference. A pledge is an idea for improvement that is meaningful to the pledger. People are asked to enter their pledges on the Saskatchewan Change Day website by Change Day on Nov. 5, 2015.

Medical student Jeffrey Poon, who serves as the SMSS VP External, pledged to make his patients feel comfortable and respected.

“I think the doctor-patient relationship is very important,” he said.

“I think it’s really important that patients feel they can trust their health care professionals and open up to them.”

Galilee Thompson, the SMSS VP Internal, pledged to “FIFE” every patient. This means she will ask her patients about their feelings, ideas, function, and expectations. Thompson said she chose that pledge because it will help “ensure that I continue to keep the human element in my interactions with patients.”

The SMSS worked with the Health Sciences Students’ Association (HSSA) to promote the Change Day pledge drive to health sciences students at the U of S. SMSS organizers said they wanted to promote interprofessionalism and collaboration between students from the various health sciences colleges. Students’ photos were taken at the Change Day booth, and those who had their photo taken with a student from another college had their names entered into a prize draw. Students were also encouraged to make the Change Day photos their social media profile pictures in celebration of Change Day on Nov. 5.

 

 

Shari Furniss

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shari Furniss is the director of collaborative learning and development at HQC

HQC employee makes two Change Day pledges

 

Shari Furniss, a Health Quality Council (HQC) employee, was so inspired by Saskatchewan Change Day that she made two pledges for the second annual campaign.

Her first pledge was to have a conversation with her parents about their wishes for end-of-life care.

“A while back, I read an article written by a woman who had founded The Conversation Project,” explained Furniss, the director of collaborative learning and development at HQC.

“When her mother became ill, she realized that she had talked to her about arrangements for after her death, but not about end-of-life care. She was then in the unfortunate situation of having to make these decisions in the middle of a crisis, without knowing what her mother wanted. In response, she created a starter kit to help families have ‘the conversation’ about end-of-life care.”

When Furniss had the conversation with her parents, she realized that she had assumed her parents would want the same things that she would want. However, she found out that wasn’t always the case.

“One of the questions in the starter kit is whether at end of life you would rather be alone or surrounded by family. One of my parents was like, ‘Sure, the more the merrier,’ while the other said, basically, ‘I’m good on my own.’ I didn’t expect that,” she said.

“In all honesty, we don’t really know unless we ask – so ask. I hope my pledge inspires other people to have the conversation. Can you imagine how much better our health care would be if families could work with providers to ensure the patients had the care they wanted, not the care we wanted to give them?”

Furniss created a video about her pledge, in which she notes 90 per cent of people say that talking with their loved ones about end-of-life care is important, but only 27 per cent have actually done so. She is grateful that The Conversation Project inspired her to have the conversation with her parents.

“I have two wonderful parents and I am blessed that they are still with us and enjoying relatively good health. But, as they near their 80s, I realized that this might not always be the case. I want to make sure that I know their wishes and am able to advocate for the kind of end-of-life care they want,” said Furniss.

“I chose this as my pledge because I knew it would force me to do it. I know this was the right thing to do, but honestly it was so hard to get started. I love my parents dearly – my mother is the sweetest person alive and my dad is my hero – so to even think about their end of life is hard. But, the reality is, we needed to talk about these things. We will not have forever, much as we may want to.”

Furniss’ second Change Day pledge was to participate in the Kindness Game – a concept she found on Facebook from one of the educational sites she follows. Furniss adapted the activity, which was designed for the classroom, into her second pledge, and committed to participating in the bingo-style Kindness Game in her workplace.

The Kindness Game encourages people to take part in various activities, such as smiling at 10 people, learning to say thank you in a new language, complimenting someone, sitting with a new person or a group of people at lunch, or giving someone a high five.

“The kindness bingo was a fun way of being more reflective on how I can relate to my colleagues on a human level, aside from the work. We’re all people, and connecting as people is important,” said Furniss.

Furniss is still in the midst of completing the Kindness Game, but so far she has learned how to say thank you in Arabic and has been smiling at others.

“Change Day is a great way to get creative and pledge to do something you might not do otherwise. I enjoy the challenge of coming up with an interesting pledge,” she said.

Saskatchewan Change Day will be held on November 5, 2015. HQC is once again organizing the social movement campaign aimed at improving our health care system. This year’s Saskatchewan Change Day theme is “Make Health Better Together.” Participants can pledge, on the Change Day website, to do something to improve their own health, the health of their workplace, or the health of the patients, residents, or clients they serve.

 

 

Ajinkya Khare

Ajinkya Khare is a strategy and visual management specialist

Saskatoon Health Region employee pledges to help prevent infection

 

Ajinkya Khare wants to ensure he does not spread illness to others.

For the second annual Saskatchewan Change Day campaign, Khare pledged to carefully follow hand hygiene guidelines and to get his flu shot as soon as possible. He also pledged to eat healthy and exercise daily.

“A healthy body rarely acts as a carrier for infections – hence protecting our community,” said Khare, who works as a strategy and visual management specialist in Saskatoon Health Region.

“This pledge is meaningful to me as I have control over my own actions; I can measure them and ensure I follow through with what I say. I work in hospitals and places where there are immune-suppressed individuals. If I take care, they will be spared the agony of infections like the flu and common cold.”

Saskatchewan Change Day will be held on November 5, 2015. The Health Quality Council is once again organizing the social movement campaign aimed at improving our health care system. This year’s Saskatchewan Change Day theme is “Make Health Better Together.” Participants can make a pledge, on the Change Day website, to do something to improve their own health, the health of their workplace, or the health of the patients, residents, or clients they serve. Participants are also welcome to make more than one pledge.

Khare is supportive of the Change Day campaign because he believes it is “small changes which make a difference in the end.” He heard about the campaign from a colleague, and thought it was a great idea.

“My pledge, I know, is a small step, but every cog working better helps the machine as a whole,” he said.

 

 

 Lenore Howey 2
 Lenore Howey

Lenore Howey wears her brightly coloured T-shirts to promote Change Day

Laboratory manager pledges to spread the word about Change Day

Lenore Howey has become a “walking advertisement” for Saskatchewan Change Day.

Howey, a Saskatoon Health Region laboratory manager who works at St. Paul’s Hospital, has pledged to spread the word about the second annual Change Day campaign and to empower others around her to make a pledge.

“I wanted to be involved in spreading the word on the meaning of Change Day. I am a true believer of continual improvement over time, and small changes make a long, sustainable change,” she said.

“Just imagine what would happen if we were all engaged to make the small changes required to make a large change.”

Saskatchewan Change Day is a province-wide campaign organized by the Health Quality Council (HQC). It is part of a global movement aimed at making small health care improvements. The idea is that everyone can make a change for the better, and that together these small changes can add up to make a big difference.

Anyone who provides health care, receives health care, or who cares about health care can pledge to make a difference. A pledge is an idea for improvement that is meaningful to the pledger. People are asked to enter their pledges on the Saskatchewan Change Day website by Change Day on Nov. 5, 2015. HQC has set the goal of receiving 2,015 pledges from across the province by Change Day 2015 – more than doubling the 2014 campaign goal of receiving 1,000 pledges.

To help spread the word about the Saskatchewan Change Day campaign, Howey is wearing brightly coloured T-shirts to work that resemble the colours found in the Change Day logo. She has written the Change Day website address – www.skchangeday.com – on the shirts, as well as the date that Change Day will be celebrated across Saskatchewan (Nov. 5, 2015). Howey is also encouraging staff members to get a bright shirt of their own and to display a Change Day pledge sticker on it, or to write out their pledge on the T-shirt once they have entered it online on the Change Day website.

“I am hoping that the number of pledges starts to rise in October as I step on the gas pedal to spread the word,” Howey said.

“I am wearing one of the Change Day colours each day and will be walking advertising – visibility. ‘Make it visible’ is a common theme in our workplace.”

 

Dr. Joy Dobson

Dr. Joy Dobson works in Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region

Regina physician makes hand hygiene pledge

 

Dr. Joy Dobson is committed to keeping her patients safe.

For the second annual Saskatchewan Change Day campaign, Dobson has pledged to wash her hands before and after every patient contact.

“Nosocomial infections are one of the biggest risks in hospitals. Patients are at their most vulnerable and we are often the vector for harm,” said Dobson, an anesthesiologist in Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region who also locums in Moose Jaw.

“I have a pretty reliable – but not perfect – routine of washing my hands after every case as I leave the room. That protects me as much as others. But I realized that even if I go directly to my next patient, that person didn’t see me wash my hands and know they are clean. I think the patient would feel safer if they see me cleanse my hands with Isagel as I enter the room to care for them.”

This year’s Saskatchewan Change Day theme is “Make Health Better Together.” Participants can make a pledge, on the Change Day website, to do something to improve their own health, the health of their workplace, or the health of the patients, residents, or clients they serve. Participants are also welcome to make more than one pledge.

Saskatchewan Change Day will be held on November 5, 2015. The Health Quality Council (HQC) is once again organizing this exciting social movement campaign aimed at improving our health care system. The goal is to receive 2,015 pledges from across the province by Change Day 2015. This more than doubles the 2014 goal of 1,000 pledges.

Dobson said she has been inspired by “the power of everyone making a small change.” She first pledged in 2014, after hearing HQC board chair Dr. Susan Shaw speak about Change Day on CBC Radio.

“This year, I posted my pledge at 3sHealth after seeing their commitment to personal and citizen health,” Dobson said.

 

Elyse Fisher

Elyse Fisher is a communications specialist at 3sHealth

3sHealth employee pledges to walk 10,000 steps each day

 

Elyse Fisher has made a Saskatchewan Change Day pledge that is dedicated to improving her personal health.

Fisher, a communications specialist at 3sHealth (Health Shared Services Saskatchewan), has pledged to walk 10,000 steps a day.

“I always struggle to stay on track with exercise and proper diet,” she said.

“I used a gift card for my birthday to purchase a Fitbit. It tracks number of steps as well as your calorie count for the day. You can observe in real time how your day is going. So now I have no excuses – I know immediately if I am hitting my 10,000 steps a day. Making the pledge is just another way to keep me honest.”

This year’s Saskatchewan Change Day theme is “Make Health Better Together.” Participants can pledge to do something to improve their own health, the health of their workplace, or the health of the patients, residents, or clients they serve. Participants are also welcome to make more than one pledge.

Saskatchewan Change Day will be celebrated on Nov. 5, 2015. Anyone who provides health care, receives health care, or who cares about health care can pledge to make a difference. People are asked to enter their pledges online on the Saskatchewan Change Day website, at www.skchangeday.com. The Health Quality Council, which organizes the Saskatchewan Change Day campaign, has set the goal of receiving 2,015 pledges from across the province for the 2015 campaign.

Fisher said her pledge is meaningful to her because “staying healthy as I age is important in so many ways.”

“Aside from just making you feel better, it has long-term implications on my quality of life, my relationships with my spouse, children, and future grandchildren,” she said.

“I want to be well enough to continue to work, travel, volunteer, and engage with friends, family, and my community. Exercising and eating healthy is a big part of that.”

 

Cory Rennie

Cory Rennie works in Prince Albert Parkland Health Region

Manager pledges to ‘devote more energy’ to staff morale

 

Cory Rennie’s Change Day pledge is focused on staff morale at his workplace.

For the second annual Saskatchewan Change Day, Rennie has pledged “to devote more energy to maintaining the morale of my staff.”

“I made this pledge because I believe that staff morale is essential towards building an efficient and successful workplace. A culture of support and learning goes a long way towards creating a positive working environment, which has a great impact on the morale of one’s staff,” said Rennie, interim manager of addiction services in Prince Albert Parkland Health Region.

“Staff are the backbone of what we do. They are on the front line. They are working diligently to provide the best service possible, and I think that my pledge is the least I can do to help support those efforts,” he said.

This year’s Saskatchewan Change Day theme is “Make Health Better Together.” Participants can make a pledge, on the Change Day website, to do something to improve their own health, the health of their workplace, or the health of the patients, residents, or clients they serve. Participants are also welcome to make more than one pledge.

Saskatchewan Change Day will be held on November 5, 2015. The Health Quality Council is once again organizing this exciting social movement campaign aimed at improving our health care system. The goal is to receive 2,015 pledges from across the province by Change Day 2015. This more than doubles the 2014 goal of 1,000 pledges.

Anyone who provides health care, receives health care or who cares about health care can pledge to do one small thing to make a difference. The idea behind Change Day is that every individual has the power to make a change for the better.

Rennie said he wanted to participate in the Change Day campaign “because every positive change, no matter how small, can have a great impact on the service we provide, the employees working within that service and, most importantly, the people receiving that service.”

 

 

Susanna Kim - Dentistry student

Oluwatosin Odeshi - Medicine student

Dentistry student Susanna Kim holds up her Change Day pledge Medicine student Oluwatosin Odeshi makes her Change Day pledge

 Fiona Hooch-Antink - Veterinary Medicine student

 Jocelyn at IPASS booth

Veterinary medicine student Fiona Hooch-Antink poses for a photo beside the Change Day pledge wall Jocelyn Ulvick, a Kaizen Specialist at the Health Quality Council, promotes Change Day at the I-PASS conference

Health sciences students make Saskatchewan Change Day pledges

Health sciences students have shown their commitment to improving health and health care by making pledges for the second annual Saskatchewan Change Day.

The Inter-Professional Annual Student Symposium (I-PASS) was held in Saskatoon on Sept. 16, 2015. The event, organized by the Health Sciences Students’ Association (HSSA-SK), attracted more than 600 first-year health sciences students, who were provided with early exposure to inter-professional education.

The Health Quality Council (HQC) was a conference sponsor and hosted a Change Day exhibitor booth at I-PASS, where the students could make their pledges and have them posted to a pledge wall.

Oluwatosin Odeshi was one of the students that participated. The first-year student at the University of Saskatchewan’s College of Medicine made a pledge related to her personal health by committing to spending “some quality time with friends and family every week.”

“I think improving health is an important movement for all of us. Change Day gives us the opportunity to reflect on our personal health and health within our community,” she said.

Saskatchewan Change Day, a province-wide campaign organized by HQC, is part of an exciting global movement aimed at making small health care improvements. The Change Day concept originated in the National Health Service in the United Kingdom and has since spread to countries around the world, including Sweden, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, India, Jordan, the Netherlands, Finland, Australia, New Zealand, Scotland, Northern Ireland, and the provinces of Saskatchewan and B.C. in Canada.

This year’s Saskatchewan Change Day theme is “Make Health Better Together.” Participants can pledge to do something to improve their own health, the health of their workplace, or the health of the patients, residents, or clients they serve.

Anyone who provides health care, receives health care, or who cares about health care can pledge to make a difference. A pledge is an idea for improvement that is meaningful to the pledger. People are asked to enter their pledges on the Saskatchewan Change Day website by Change Day on November 5, 2015. HQC has set the goal of receiving 2,015 pledges from across the province by Change Day 2015, more than doubling the 2014 campaign goal of receiving 1,000 pledges.

Susanna Kim, who is studying in the College of Dentistry, is another health sciences student who made a Change Day pledge. Her pledge was also related to personal health, as she committed to taking “30 minutes each day to exercise or participate in a relaxation activity.” She said she wanted to make the pledge so she would “stay mindful and motivated.”

Fiona Hooch-Antink, a student at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine, pledged to “always acknowledge the health, comfortability, and safety of my clients, owners, patients, co-workers, and myself.”

“I wanted to make a pledge to hold myself accountable to a simple task that I can do every single day,” she said.

 

 

Kardynal; Dione

Dione Kardynal is a KPO Specialist in North Battleford

Prairie North employee pledges to support continuous improvement in health care

 

Dione Kardynal is committed to helping her colleagues continually improve the care that is provided in Prairie North Health Region.

Kardynal, a Kaizen Promotion Office (KPO) Specialist in North Battleford, made a Saskatchewan Change Day pledge to “visit the gembas that I have worked on in order to support the managers and staff to continue making things better for our patients, families and staff.” The term “gemba” refers to the place where the work happens, such as on a hospital ward, in a long-term care facility or in an office.

Kardynal’s job focuses on continuous improvement in health care. She assists managers and employees with improving the care that is provided to patients by using Lean tools such as Rapid Process Improvement Workshops (RPIWs) and the 5S process, which helps reclaim underutilized space in facilities.

“I made this pledge because it is a piece of my work I can do better.  We make excellent improvements during RPIWs and 5S, but I worry that we then leave process owners and staff with lots of work to do afterwards without the support needed,” she said.

“I want to feel like I have done my best to support staff in the great improvements and want to keep the momentum and excitement going. The follow on work is what really makes the difference to staff and patients.”

Kardynal is supportive of the Saskatchewan Change Day campaign, which encourages everyone to commit to making a small positive change. This year’s Saskatchewan Change Day theme is “Make Health Better Together.” Participants can make a pledge online to do something to improve their own health, the health of their workplace, or the health of the patients, residents, or clients they serve.

Kardynal wanted to participate in the Change Day campaign and make a change for the better.

“I think it is important to continue to challenge myself as an employee for the health region and for my own growth,” she said.

 

 

Johnston; Chanel

Chanel Johnston is a KPO Specialist in Lloydminster

Prairie North employee pledges to spread the word about Change Day

 

Chanel Johnston is supportive of the Change Day campaign, and her pledge reflects that.

Johnston has pledged to talk to three people per week about the second annual Saskatchewan Change Day, which will be celebrated on November 5, 2015.

“Since Change Day is a new initiative Saskatchewan has implemented, it needs to be spread to as many people as possible to sustain the momentum it has gained,” said Johnston, a Kaizen Promotion Office (KPO) Specialist in Prairie North Health Region.

“By talking to three people per week about Change Day, I hope to educate those who are not aware and want to jump on board,” she said.

Saskatchewan Change Day is part of a global movement aimed at making small health care improvements. The Change Day concept originated in the National Health Service in England and has since spread to countries around the world, including Sweden, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, India, Jordan, the Netherlands, Finland, Australia, New Zealand, Scotland, Northern Ireland, and the provinces of Saskatchewan and B.C. in Canada. Saskatchewan’s Health Quality Council organized Canada’s first Change Day campaign in 2014, and is also organizing Saskatchewan Change Day again in 2015.

This year’s Saskatchewan Change Day theme is “Make Health Better Together.” Participants can pledge to do something to improve their own health, the health of their workplace, or the health of the patients, residents, or clients they serve. Participants are also welcome to make more than one pledge.

Anyone who provides health care, receives health care, or who cares about health care can pledge to make a difference. A pledge is an idea for improvement that is meaningful to the pledger. People are asked to enter their pledges on the Saskatchewan Change Day website by November 5, 2015. Participants can act on their pledge any time before Change Day. HQC has set the goal of receiving 2,015 pledges from across the province by Change Day 2015 – more than doubling the 2014 campaign goal of 1,000 pledges.

Johnston sees Change Day as a natural extension of her work, which is focused on health system improvement. She said Change Day aligns with the kaizen concept of making continuous incremental changes.

“Through Change Day, we are practicing what we preach. I am a strong believer in walking the talk,” she said.

“The more people that I can educate, and get them to make pledges, will add to the cause. Who knows? Maybe a pledge made by someone I have influenced may impact, in a positive manner, a patient’s or a staff member’s experience. You never know what happens regarding the ripple effect.

“The Change Day campaign is such a positive one, so how can you not jump on board? Making sure you are keeping true to your pledge – now that’s the challenge. I will challenge my fellow co-workers to ensure they are sticking to their pledge, which will keep me in check, too.”

 

 

Ken Buchynski pic

Ken Buchynski works in Prairie North Health Region

Nursing manager pledges to provide quality care every day

 

Ken Buchynski’s Change Day pledge has caused him to “stop and reflect on my nursing practice – why I am here and how I can make a difference in my patients’ care.”

For the second annual Saskatchewan Change Day, Buchynski, a nursing manager working in Prairie North Health Region, pledged to be there for his patients and provide quality care on a daily basis.

“It helps to remind me why I chose the nursing profession to begin with. As a nursing manager, I can make change that will be meaningful to the patients that we provide care to,” he said.

Saskatchewan Change Day, which will be held on November 5, 2015, is part of an exciting global movement aimed at making small health care improvements. The Change Day concept originated in the National Health Service in the United Kingdom and has spread to countries around the world. The Health Quality Council organized Canada’s first Change Day campaign in 2014, and is also organizing Saskatchewan Change Day again in 2015.

This year’s Saskatchewan Change Day theme is “Make Health Better Together.” Participants can make a pledge online to do something to improve their own health, the health of their workplace, or the health of the patients, residents, or clients they serve.

Buchynski was happy to participate in the Saskatchewan Change Day campaign.

“I feel it is a time to reflect and be part of a campaign that will deliver awesome care to the patients we care for on a daily basis,” he said.

“As well, I support this initiative because I believe everyone in the nursing profession should take the time to periodically reassess and reflect on their own practice.”

 

 

Lisa Yushchyshyn

Lisa Yushchyshyn is the Manager of Women’s Health at Lloydminster Hospital

Prairie North manager values patient- and family-centred care

 

Lisa Yushchyshyn wants to make sure that family members are included in patient care.

For the second annual Saskatchewan Change Day, Yushchyshyn, the Manager of Women’s Health at Lloydminster Hospital in Prairie North Health Region, has pledged to “ensure patient and family friendly care is being provided on a daily basis.”

“In my area, Maternity, we are creating families and, as such, get to see miracles every day. However, sometimes I feel that in our need to get the nursing process completed on our timeline, we forget that this is a family,” said Yushchyshyn, a registered nurse.

Patient- and Family-Centred Care (PFCC) is a philosophy based in respect, dignity, collaboration, information sharing, and meaningful participation. In 2014, a provincial PFCC strategy was finalized in Saskatchewan and a new governance structure was developed to support the strategy. The three-year strategy seeks to support health regions to increase the level of engagement of patients and families in their own care, in each organization and across the province’s health system.

Yushchyshyn said her Change Day pledge is meaningful to her.

“I’ve had two children and have been blessed with multiple nieces and nephews in which my whole family arrived to celebrate the joy in. I’ve also lost my father and two children and have had my family rally around each other to get us through those times,” she said.

“Being included in the care and knowing how to navigate the ‘system’ is what made these situations easier. I know, however, that many families don’t have that inner knowledge, but want to be able to help as much as they can. A health care system that pushes them away is never going to be successful.”

This year’s Saskatchewan Change Day theme is “Make Health Better Together.” Anyone who provides health care, receives health care, or who cares about health care can pledge to make a difference. People are asked to enter their pledges on the Saskatchewan Change Day website by November 5, 2015. The Health Quality Council has set the goal of receiving 2,015 pledges from across the province for Change Day 2015 – more than doubling the 2014 campaign goal of 1,000 pledges.

Yushchyshyn said she participated in the Change Day campaign because she feels “it’s important for everyone to keep our goals in mind.”

“I believe in education and in bettering ourselves. Ensuring we’re always striving for that next step is what keeps us evolving,” she said.

 

 

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Dr. Mark Wahba works in Saskatoon Health Region

Emergency physician pledges to make follow-up appointments for patients

 

Dr. Mark Wahba has made a Saskatchewan Change Day pledge that will have a positive impact on the patients he sees in the Emergency Department.

Wahba, an emergency physician who works in Saskatoon Health Region, made the following pledge: “When I would like a patient to follow up with their family doctor after their ER visit, I’m going to call their doctor’s office and make the appointment for them.”

By doing that, Wahba hopes to shorten the amount of time a patient has to wait for an appointment with his or her family physician.

“After some Emergency Department visits, it is beneficial for people to follow up and be reassessed within a short timeframe,” he said.

“Unfortunately, I sometimes hear patients say, ‘It takes weeks to get in to see my family doctor.’ I wondered, ‘If I call and speak to their family physician or the receptionist, could we find a way to get them seen sooner?’

“Family physicians and primary care teams are the best providers when it comes to continuity of care. We sometimes see people return to the Emergency Department for problems that their family physicians would want to see, and probably should see. If I can help coordinate better follow up and continuity for the patient and their family physician, hopefully the patient will have a better outcome.”

The second annual Saskatchewan Change Day will be held on November 5, 2015. The Health Quality Council is once again organizing this exciting social movement campaign aimed at improving our health care system. The goal is to receive 2,015 pledges on the Saskatchewan Change Day website from across the province by Change Day 2015. This more than doubles the 2014 goal of 1,000 pledges.

Anyone who provides health care, receives health care, or who cares about health care can pledge to do one small thing to make a difference. The idea behind Change Day is that every individual has the power to make a change for the better – a concept Wahba supports.

“I think all health care providers can look at what they are doing and find small ways to improve. We are all in this together, so we all need to look at what we can do differently,” he said.

Wahba has already acted on his Change Day pledge. He made an appointment for a patient for follow up with her family physician five days later, which he said “worked out really well.”

 

 

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Carol Gregoryk is the VP of Integrated Health Services in Prince Albert Parkland Health Region

Prince Albert Parkland VP pledges to ‘keep the patient first’

 

Carol Gregoryk has made an important pledge for Saskatchewan Change Day – to “keep the patient first always.”

“We frequently get caught up in the day-to-day of our business and need to remember to take a step back and focus on the patient and their families, from their perspective,” said Gregoryk, the VP of Integrated Health Services in Prince Albert Parkland Health Region.

“We may think we know this as health care professionals but, time and again, what we believe is important is not necessarily the same thing for the patient.”

Gregoryk also noted that “being on the other side of the fence as a patient or family member” can provide a different perspective for those working in the health system.

The second annual Saskatchewan Change Day will be held on Nov. 5, 2015, and the Health Quality Council has set the goal of receiving 2,015 pledges from across the province by that date. People are asked to enter their pledges on the Saskatchewan Change Day website.

Gregoryk said she wanted to participate in the Change Day campaign because “writing down a pledge commits one to keeping that pledge.”

 

 

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Prince Albert physician Dr. Cecil Hammond

Prince Albert physician pledges to improve quality of care

 

Dr. Cecil Hammond is striving to improve the quality of care he provides to his patients.

That goal was the focus of his pledge for the second annual Saskatchewan Change Day campaign, which runs until Nov. 5.

“I made this pledge so that I would strive to improve the quality of care I provide to my patients at the Prince Albert Medical Clinic. We have so much evidence-based clinical information out there that every day new advances in care, therapy, medicines, diagnostics, and resources are becoming available. Utilizing these resources, I am hoping to improve the quality of care I provide,” he said.

Hammond decided to make a Change Day pledge because he felt “it was the right thing to do” and “it was the right time to do it.” He has been practicing medicine in Saskatchewan for several years and doesn’t want to become complacent about the care he provides to the patients of this province.

“Every patient I see, I ask myself the question: ‘What would I want done if this was my mother, father, brother, or sister?’ ”

Hammond, who is originally from South Africa, moved to Saskatchewan in 2008. He previously served as senior medical officer in Keewatin Yatthe Health Region, and currently serves as senior medical officer in Prince Albert Parkland Health Region.

Hammond wants to provide the best care possible to his patients, and notes that he identifies “more strongly day by day” with the provincial logo of Putting Patients First – Better Health, Better Care, Better Value, Better Teams.

“If I can improve each day, I know the lives of my patients will get better each day,” he said.

 

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Beth Vachon is the CEO of Cypress Health Region

 

Cypress Health Region CEO plants a garden for Change Day

 

Cypress Health Region CEO Beth Vachon has made a Change Day pledge related to improving her personal health. Her pledge was to plant a large garden and a pumpkin patch, because “it’s good physical activity, and the bonus will be all the wonderful organic food through the summer.”

“I made this pledge because I spend hours working in my yard each summer. I grow lots of flowers and a few tomatoes. This year I decided that I would grow a vegetable garden also. I have two large corners of my backyard that I had intended to landscape – instead, one is now my garden and the other is my pumpkin patch,” she said.

“This pledge is important to me because not only is homegrown produce good for you, there is a sense of accomplishment when you prepare food straight from the earth to the table. I have three grandchildren and I want them to have the opportunity to see where food comes from, to spend time with me in the garden and to enjoy what we harvest. When I was growing up, everyone had a vegetable garden, but that doesn’t seem to be so anymore.

“Is gardening becoming a lost art? Not in my backyard!”

Vachon, who is also a Health Quality Council board member, is supportive of the Saskatchewan Change Day campaign. The second annual Saskatchewan Change Day will be held on November 5, 2015. The Health Quality Council is once again organizing this social movement campaign aimed at improving the province’s health care system. The goal is to receive 2,015 pledges at www.skchangeday.com from across the province by Change Day 2015.

Participants can pledge to do something to improve their own health, the health of their workplace, or the health of the patients, residents, or clients they serve. Participants are also welcome to make more than one pledge.

“I chose to participate in Change Day because I believe small changes over time make the biggest difference,” said Vachon.

 

 

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Dr. Mark Brown is the new president of the Saskatchewan Medical Association

New SMA president pledges to increase social media use

 

Dr. Mark Brown plans to increase his use of social media to inform the public about important health care issues, both provincially and nationally. This commitment stems from his pledge for the second annual Saskatchewan Change Day.

Brown, the new president of the Saskatchewan Medical Association (SMA), made the pledge during the SMA’s 2015 Spring Representative Assembly held in Saskatoon in May. As part of his new leadership role, one of his strategic goals is to improve communication “at all levels” with other doctors, health care workers, and patients. Brown said he was inspired by the Canadian Medical Association’s use of social media, “so I felt it was time Saskatchewan stepped up, too.”

“We can easily reach a wide audience and hopefully influence the public in a more meaningful and appropriate way – especially to reach Generations X and Y,” said Brown, a family physician from Moose Jaw.

Change Day focuses on making small changes that, when combined, can add up to make a big difference in the health system. Change Day is about the power within every individual to make a change for the better.

Brown, who is a strong proponent of quality improvement and collaborative care, is supportive of the Saskatchewan Change Day campaign.

“I’m a believer in grassroots change and I feel this is the most successful way to make meaningful change possible,” he said.

 

 

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Health Minister Dustin Duncan (left) poses for a photo with HQC board chair Dr. Susan Shaw

Saskatchewan’s health minister makes two Change Day pledges

 

The province’s health minister has made commitments to improve his personal health, as part of the second annual Saskatchewan Change Day campaign.

Health Minister Dustin Duncan made two Change Day pledges during the Saskatchewan Medical Association’s Representative Assembly in Saskatoon in May. His pledges were to “eat healthy – no ice cream!” and to “take the stairs instead of the elevator at work.”

The 2015 Saskatchewan Change Day theme is “Make Health Better Together.” Participants can pledge to do something to improve their own health, the health of their workplace, or the health of the patients, residents, or clients they serve. Participants are also welcome to make more than one pledge.

Anyone who provides health care, receives health care, or who cares about health care can pledge to make a difference. A pledge is an idea for improvement that is meaningful to the pledger. People are asked to enter their pledges on the Saskatchewan Change Day website, at www.skchangeday.com, by November 5, 2015. Participants can act on their pledge any time before Change Day. The Health Quality Council (HQC) has set the goal of receiving 2,015 pledges from across the province by Change Day 2015 – more than doubling the 2014 campaign goal of 1,000 pledges.

 

 

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Saskatoon Health Region CEO Dan Florizone

Saskatoon Health Region CEO authors online pledge journal

 

Saskatoon Health Region CEO Dan Florizone has made a pledge for Saskatchewan Change Day: “to seek, listen to and understand the individual experiences of 365 patients and their families in 2015.”

As a result of that pledge, Florizone has created an online journal – entitled Dan’s Pledge Journal – that describes his conversations with patients and families. So far he has chatted with a family that travelled from Regina for specialized pediatric inpatient services, a daughter who talked about the death of her mother, a man who was waiting while his wife underwent diagnostic tests, and several others.

To read the online journal, visit https://danspledge.wordpress.com/.

 

 

 

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Cyclists Dr. John Dosman (right), Dr. Leane Bettin and Dr. Erin Selzer hold Change Day pledge cards

 

Saskatoon doctor pledges to bike to work with colleagues

 

Dr. John Dosman has made a Change Day pledge that is inspiring others.

Dosman, who works at the Saskatoon Community Clinic, pledged to offer to bicycle to work with his co-workers “to get them confident enough to continue to use active transportation in their lives.”

“I chose this pledge because I’ve been a long-time advocate of cycling as a simple way to improve one’s mental and physical health. It also takes CO2-producing vehicles off the road and reduces traffic congestion,” Dosman said, adding that cycling also makes seeing patients easier at the city’s hospitals when traffic is heavy, bridges are closed and vehicle parking is limited.

Dosman recently biked to work with his colleagues Dr. Leane Bettin and Dr. Erin Selzer, who work in family medicine obstetrics with him. He said they enjoyed their bike to work, and the trio even stopped at Royal University Hospital on the way to the downtown clinic to see their patients there.

Dosman said he likes the Saskatchewan Change Day campaign, which encourages people to pledge to improve their personal health, the health of their workplace, or the health of the patients, residents, or clients they serve.

“Work in the health care field can be busy and challenging, and sometimes the focus can be so strongly on patient care, or even the negative or challenging things at work, that one loses sight of one’s own physical and mental health and the health of one’s workplace or one’s coworkers,” he said.

“I liked that Change Day is a good stimulus and reminder to take a step back and work on making sure we, and our colleagues, are as happy and healthy as possible so we can do a better job of caring for others and each other.”

 

 

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Nurses are showing their support for Saskatchewan Change Day 2015

Saskatchewan nurses make group Change Day pledge

 

Enthusiasm is growing for Saskatchewan Change Day, with 270 nurses showing their support for the 2015 campaign by making a group pledge.

The nurses’ pledge is entitled “Collaboration – RNs for a Winning Future.” They have committed to “coming together as one voice to advance patient-centered care in the public interest.”

The pledge was made on May 6, 2015, in Saskatoon as part of the Saskatchewan Registered Nurses’ Association (SRNA) annual meeting. At the meeting, the SRNA also challenged the Saskatchewan Medical Association (SMA) to pledge as part of “a battle of the AGMs.” The SMA, which will hold its spring representative assembly in Saskatoon on May 8, accepted the challenge.

We will see which organization generates the most Change Day pledges!

 

 

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Dr. Dennis Kendel does a headstand as SRNA executive director Karen Eisler looks on

 

HQC vice-chair does a headstand for Change Day

 

Dr. Dennis Kendel, the vice-chair of the Health Quality Council board, is getting creative in how he spreads the word about Saskatchewan Change Day.

Kendel did a headstand at the Saskatchewan Registered Nurses’ Association (SRNA) annual meeting in Saskatoon on May 6, 2015. A photo of the impressive feat was captured at the event and shared on social media to promote Change Day.

Kendel did the headstand to encourage people to pledge and to spread this message: “Change up, change down – just change!” He repeated the feat at the Saskatchewan Medical Association (SMA) representative assembly on May 8 to encourage doctors to pledge.

 

 

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Rufus the dog enjoys some treats during a visit to a long-term care facility

Rufus the dog visits residents at long-term care facility

 

Dog owner Tanya Verrall has seen how interacting with pets can improve someone’s day and bring a smile to their face.

That’s why she incorporated her dog, Rufus, into her pledge for the second annual Saskatchewan Change Day. Verrall pledged to brighten up visits with her aunt, who lives in a long-term care facility in Saskatoon, by bringing along her dog.

“Seeing dogs always makes her smile,” said Verrall, who is the director of health system integration and networking at the Health Quality Council.

Verrall recently went to visit her aunt, Irene, and brought Rufus with her. Her aunt happily fed Rufus treats, and some of the other residents at the long-term care facility also enjoyed interacting with the dog.

“My aunt had to stay in bed when I visited her, but I was also able to take Rufus down the hall to the TV room and visit with some of the other residents. It was a lot of fun. Rufus loved the attention, and we saw a lot of smiles,” said Verrall.

“A few of the residents told us about the pets they used to have.  I asked my aunt what it means to her to have Rufus come for a visit and she said, ‘It means a lot. It’s a warm feeling you get. It’s good for your morale. It sparks memories of dogs and pets we (residents) used to have.’ ”

Verrall’s aunt was also inspired to make a Change Day pledge of her own. The title of her pledge is “assisting my fellow residents in long-term care.”

“I pledge to be the voice for those who cannot speak for themselves at the long-term care facility where I live,” she wrote.

People can make pledges for Saskatchewan Change Day 2015 online at www.skchangeday.com until Nov. 5, 2015.

 

 

Health Quality Council board members, CEO make pledges

 

Members of the Health Quality Council’s board, and the organization’s CEO, have made pledges for Saskatchewan Change Day 2015.

Here are some of their pledges:

 Susan Shaw 1 (3)Board chair Dr. Susan Shaw, who practices critical care and anesthesiology within Saskatoon Health Region, has pledged to “sit down and be at eye level when talking with all patients and families.”  Dennis Kendel (3)Vice-chair Dr. Dennis Kendel, who is also the CEO of saskdocs, has pledged to “interact with every U of S medical student and resident about Change Day and encourage them to pledge.”
Werner Oberholzer (3)Board member Dr. Werner Oberholzer, who has a family practice at the Radville Marian Health Centre, has pledged to “incorporate the Choosing Wisely campaign in the daily care delivery to patients.” Dan Fox (3)International board member Dan Fox has pledged to “encourage at least one additional provider system in the United States to conduct a Change Day.”

Gary Teare (3)

Gary Teare, who was named CEO of the Health Quality Council in April 2015, has pledged to “become a regular volunteer at the Lighthouse shelter.”

 

We want to hear from you! Tell us about your Saskatchewan Change Day pledge.

 

  • What inspired your pledge?
  • Why is your pledge meaningful to you?
  • What happened when you acted on your pledge?
  • What changes have you seen as a result of your pledge?
  • How have others responded to your pledge?
  • Why did you want to get involved with Saskatchewan Change Day?

Email us your thoughts and Change Day photos, and we may feature your story on this page!


Change Day news releases and media clips