7 Ways, 3P sessions first step for Victoria Hospital project (Prince Albert Parkland)

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Planning is underway for the redevelopment of the Victoria Hospital

Planning is underway, with the Region already having completed a 7 Ways exercise to determine a desirable configuration of departments and services spaces in a redevelopment of the Victoria Hospital. More than 30 managers, physicians, staff members, and patient representatives, examined seven different design options on March 7th. The 7 Ways session is an early step in using Lean methodology in the design of a construction project. An architect firm develops seven different options for block design of the construction project, and the session’s participants go through each design. They eventual choose one option as the basis for moving forward.

There were many interesting ideas, and in the next steps in the planning we may revisit some of those ideas to ensure we have the best-possible design to meet the needs of our patients. (Cecile Hunt, Chief Executive Officer, PAPHR)

“While we have chosen one design to move forward with, we will not lose the elements present in some of the other models,” said Cecile Hunt, Chief Executive Officer, PAPHR. “There were many interesting ideas, and in the next steps in the planning we may revisit some of those ideas to ensure we have the best-possible design to meet the needs of our patients. Our Region has also used some of the work contained in the Master Plan developed in 2009-2010.”

The next step in the planning process is the first 3P session. 3P (Production Preparation Process) is a Lean method that is used in construction. It uses information gathered through observations (completed in February 2014 at the Victoria Hospital), which assists the more than 40 participants in the design session to build models for the future development.

The first 3P session for the Victoria Hospital renewal was held March 31-April 4. Participants included PAPHR managers, staff members, physicians and patient representatives. This 3P will be focused on the Emergency Department, Operating Rooms, Day Surgery, Diagnostic Imaging, and the front entrance area of the Victoria Hospital. The session will be held in a warehouse area being rented from SHARE (Self Help and Recreation Education). Participants will look at different designs, and build progressively larger models to test patient and staff flow.

For a look at how 3P is used to design construction projects, check out these videos about the new Moose Jaw Hospital and the Saskatchewan Children’s Hospital. Links can be also found on the Five Hills and Saskatoon Health Region website.

The Health Region has recognized the need for the redevelopment of the Victoria Hospital for several years. The planning will focus on a potential expansion and renovation of the existing site, to ensure that the facility has the capacity to meet the demands for health care services from the Region, as well as the northern and northeastern areas that make up its service area.

The planning will focus on a potential expansion and renovation of the existing site, to ensure that the facility has the capacity to meet the demands for health care services from the Region, as well as the northern and northeastern areas that make up its service area.

The current Victoria Hospital was built in the 1960s, and opened in 1969. There were major renovations and some additions to the hospital structure starting in the late 1990s. All of these renovations were to support the growing service demands, including both ambulatory care needs (such as diabetes, chemotherapy, etc.) and inpatient care.

The renovations that were started in the mid-1990s were never fully completed. This resulted in some programs being located in areas there were to be only temporary, along with creating challenges related to patient and staff flow in the facility.

There are space challenges for the emergency department, ambulatory care programs, and support services. This is especially true for the obstetrics unit, which was designed to accommodate up to 1,000 births per year. The average is now about 1,500 births per year, and double occupancy in rooms designed for single occupancy is commonplace. The dialysis program has grown substantially, and demands for increased volumes cannot be accommodate in the current space.

In addition, the inpatient units are averaging 100 per cent capacity on a daily basis. This demand has grown over the past several years, and presents challenges for both patient and staff safety. There are few options for where patients can be placed when the overcapacity occurs. This often results in patients remaining in the emergency department and creating capacity challenges for that unit.

The Victoria Hospital’s specialist complement has grown in the past several years, and the various programs are now a regular referral option for both the Region’s residents as well as northern and northeastern Saskatchewan. The surgical capacity has sometimes been limited by the ability to have inpatient beds available for surgical patients.

Photo: More than 30 managers, staff member and physicians discussed options for the redesign of the Victoria Hospital at a 7 Ways event on March 7th. The team selected one option as the based design for moving forward with planning for the redevelopment of the Victoria Hospital.

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